you are now leaving your comfort zone

How are you doing? I hope you’re well and not too lonely. These are uncertain times, but really, aren’t all times?

Before the virus reached Washington State, I was ready to move back into learning mode and away from production mode. I think there are 18-20 canvasses sitting in the living room (where else) and probably 75 drawings upstairs?

So, I signed up for a mix of online and in-person classes. Then the virus sent us home and my art studio went online! Now art history, contemporary art class joins a drawing class , etc, etc!

The drawing curriculum is from Sue Hettmansperger an artist and professor emeritus, via my art studio (The Miller School of Art). Her own work is beautiful.

The curriculum consists of things like: sit in a darkened room, recording your reactions to noises. Notice that she doesn’t say “draw the sounds” – it’s draw your reactions. And: “Pair intention with a particular mark and its most suitable medium.” It’s an intuitive drawing class. So I’m having to remind myself again and again – I’m not depicting – I’m drawing my responses. Awk-ward!

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21st century Bob Ross: Jose Trujillo!

Looking for a new direction for myself. I spent some fun time this week learning floating ink paper marbling (“suminagashi”):

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Then I looked for “contemporary landscape oil painting” and found the 21st century Bob Ross: Jose Trujillo! This video link is 11:00 minutes of a conversation between Mr. Trujillo and his young son, Monet, WHILE painting a landscape! It’s very sweet and I really liked his loose brushwork and colors!

My first attempt at a Trujillo! (16×24,oil)

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illustration

I’m “drawn” to illustration (sorry-not sorry!). My first exposure to art was picture books and I was born around the time of “the golden age” of children’s book illustration: Robert McCloskey, Ludwig Bemelmans, Ernest Shepherd, Virginia Lee Burton. Wonderful stuff!

And I was brought up with The New Yorker – whose illustrated covers were almost always stories, and very often stories with a wink attached.

So I realized (later) all that came into play when I got the idea for this: a mash-up of a photo of a Swedish girl and her fuzzy dog, and an Edward Hicks ‘Peaceable Kingdom’ poster that has hung in my home for 30+ years.

(not quite done . . .)

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experiment

So, this was the challenge I set up for myself. Start with a warm-up. Warm up is using graphite on 24×36” paper. Warm up is drawing with my whole arms (a graphite stick in each hand) making as many different kinds of marks as I can, but without a plan. Just moving.

Part two: using an eraser only, pull out a self-portrait. No adding any more lines. And do it ten times.

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Part three: after 10 times I allowed myself to add in more lines. Still thinking about it. hmmmmm.

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resolved

You know that procrastination you do about that thing that scares you? I joined a Meet Up group online that lists local live model figure drawing classes weekly. Week after week I received the notices. After week. After week. Then I made it a New Year’s resolution to go. Today I did. It was easy, perfect, relaxed, serious. Yay!

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blue tape philosophy

A post on Facebook declared that Picasso created about 50,000 art works, of which 100 today are known/valued. The point of the post was that art is a numbers game – and not every thing you make is going to be quality, revolutionary, evanescent.

But you/I will have made it.

I regularly put stuff up that I’ve made – but not framed – I put it up with blue painter’s tape. I’m looking at it, I’m thinking about it, but I see it all as practice and learning. It’s rarely a finished product.

That being said, I can also still get moody – up-moody or down-moody about the process, my stuff. Helps to notice that, and remember that the critical mind cannot make a damn thing.

chairs, oil, 9×12 inches

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